Pursuit – Incredible Weather Photography by Stephen Locke

By on July 29, 2014, in Photography

One look at Stephen Locke’s images and you’ll wonder when Thor would show up with his hammer. That vicious-looking cloud up there spewing lightning volts is not the harbinger of doomsday, it is simply a supercell storm. According to Wikipedia, “supercells are the overall least common and have the potential to be the most severe”. Normal people take one look at that cloud and start running away in the opposite direction, Stephen Locke on the other hand, chases after it with his camera in tow. Which is a good thing for us because it means WE don’t have to run after supercell storms to appreciate their awesomeness.

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Shooting Heroes – Sport Photography by Philip Haynes

By on July 28, 2014, in Photography

Philip Haynes describes himself as a Norwich boy who happens to shoot heroes. He is currently based in the UK with an impressive list of clients including Men’s Health, O2, and Converse. Represented by The Peter Bailey Company, Philip looks to ‘capture the energy of saturation in color, just as much as the energy within the movement’. One of his more recent series, The Crossfitters, highlights the pain, intensity, and determination of the athletes.

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Reality vs Photoshop – Awesome Images by Martín De Pasquale

By on July 27, 2014, in Photography

Martín De Pasquale is currently making waves all over the internet with his amazing photoshop wizardry. With awesome concepts and flawless composition, Martin is gathering quite a following. He is his favorite model and he’s not shy of taking bites out of himself, peeling off his face, or even dragging his head on the pavement. The surreal circumstances he puts himself in is rather quirky and amusing. The whole web is itching to see more from this Buenos Aires-based artist.

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Fluff, Grit, and Bristles – Industrial Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki

By on July 26, 2014, in Sculpture

Takahiro Iwasaki is the artist behind these industrial landscapes made with bits of fluff, grit and bristles. The sculpture up there is part of his “Out of Disorder” series – sculptures featuring miniature industrial landscapes made out of human hair, toothbrush bristles, used cloth fibers, lint, and actual dust. The sculptures resemble urban land leveled by an air raid, form the base of the Kawasaki series. Takahiro, based in Hiroshima, Japan currently has his work displayed at the Kawasaki City Museum as part of the Open Museum Project.

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Broken Mirror/Evening Sky – Images by Bing Wright

By on July 25, 2014, in Photography

Bing Wright is a New York-based photographer who is not at all concerned with the seven years’ bad luck associated with broken mirrors. In his series Broken Mirror/Evening Sky, he features broken mirrors reflecting sunsets and evening skies. The mirrors Wright uses are actually quite small at fourteen by eleven inches’ compared to the final prints which measure four feet by six feet. The images resemble stained glass windows and according to one website, “(the) series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure.”.

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Other Worlds – Illustrations by Ana Bagayan

By on July 24, 2014, in Illustrations

Ana Bagayan’s work is inspired by the metaphysical, often featuring ghosts, spirits, and intergalactic creatures. It can be a bit unsettling at first but the longer you look at her work, the longer you want to keep on looking. Ana was born in Armenia and obtained her Bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. She currently lives and works in the mountains of Southern California with her husband, and two rambunctious dogs.

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In the Big Blue – Underwater Photography by Mattias Ormestad

By on July 23, 2014, in Photography

That cute little glowing fellow up there is the Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes). Mattias Ormesta, a freelance Swedish photographer, is the guy responsible for capturing that adorable expression on his face. Mattias is currently involved with the development of the imaging platform of the Tara Oceans Expedition. As co-founder of the Kahi Kai team, he is responsible for taking both macro and microscopy photos of planktonic and benthic sea creatures. Matthias is also a developmental biologist. He is currently based in Stockholm, Sweden.

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Hidden Things – Camouflage Photography by Aaron Hegert

By on July 22, 2014, in Concept Art

Aaron Hegert delights in capturing images of hidden things, especially when he’s the one who hid them in the first place. His series “Foxhole” documents his attempts at catching “a glimpse of something between the seen and unseen”. According to Aaron, photography, like camouflage, is the visual product of a spatial practice: both require a presence and awareness in the material environment, and both entail a perceived transmutation of that environment. His photographs borrow criteria from various tactics of camouflage in both the natural and synthetic world. Thus the ‘how’ of disappearance remains the same but the ‘why’ remains mysterious.

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Awesome Overflowing Embroidery by Ana Teresa Barboza

By on July 21, 2014, in Sculpture

Ana Teresa Barboza is an artist who thinks out of the box and decided to elevate the art of embroidery. Her creations are not limited to the embroidery circle. They flow right out and practically begs the onlooker to touch them. Ana uses threads of various colors, sizes, lengths to achieve this effect. She said: “Both embroidery and crocheting are techniques that require time. I use these techniques in order to make a connection between manual work and the processes of nature; creating thread structures similar to the structures that make a plant for example.”

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Extraordinary Wall Art by Yusuke Asai

By on July 20, 2014, in Interior Design

Yusuke Asai is the artist behind this extraordinary mural painted right into the walls of a classroom in India. Yusuke is part of the team of artists sent by The Wall Art Project to Niranjana, a school located in Bahir (East India). The Wall Art Project is a Tokyo-based non-profit organization whose goal is to bring art into schools in far flung areas like Tibet and India. Yusuke is best known for making absurdly beautiful works of art with pretty much anything he can get his hands on. A trait which came in handy in East India. The extraordinary wall painting you see up there was made with seven different types of local soil, cow dung (don’t ask why), straw, and water. The wall art disintegrated after several months but I bet it’s beauty lasted in the minds of those children long after it completely washed away.

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