Realistic Glass Paperweights by Paul Joseph Stankard

By on August 22, 2014, in Sculpture

Paul Joseph Stankard is the brilliant artist behind these floral glass paperweights. He is a pioneer of the studio-glass movement and considered by many as the father of modern glass paperweights. He started out as a glassblower, creating specialized glass instruments for chemical laboratories. He made glass paperweights on the side to support his growing family. His expertise as a artist was first recognized by Reese Palley (an internationally respected art dealer) who saw his work at a craft display in Atlantic City. The rest, as they say, is history. His work is currently on display at more than sixty museums all over the world. He said: “I am interested in integrating mysticism with botanical realism, giving the glass organic credibility. Through the work, I reference the continuum of nature, by portraying and exploring the mysteries of seeds, fertility and decay. The work celebrates the primal beauty of nature on an intimate level.”

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Cranio Nacre – Sculptures by Gregory Raymond Halili

By on August 21, 2014, in Sculpture

Gregory Raymond Halili was born and raised in the lush and tropical country of the Philippines. His family moved to the USA in the late 80s when he was in his teens. Gregory earned his B.F.A. from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. One of his most recent series feature skulls delicately carved into gold and black-lipped mother of pearl shells. Mother of pearl is also known as nacre. It is the inner shell layer of most molluscs and it’s what the outer layer of pearls are made of. Gregory hand bases his carvings on an anatomically correct moel and changed the proportion according to the size of the shell he’s carving. He is currently based in New Jersey.

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Faceless – Photography by Evelyn Bencicova

By on August 20, 2014, in Photography

Evelyn Bencicova is a Berlin-based artist famous for her somber-hued photographs. She uses the human figure as a sculptural tool instead of an individual. Most of her images present flat, grey-tinged lighting that enhances the subject instead of retracting from it. According to one website: “The way Bencicova hides the faces of her models from the camera’s eye can be seen as a reference to the indiscriminate nature of death, as the increasing destruction of the private self found in modern culture, and the dehumanization of women within the political struggle over the control of their bodies.

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Life-Sized Scrap Metal Sculptures by John Lopez

By on August 19, 2014, in Sculpture

John Lopez is a bronze sculptor from South Dakota who created these life-sized animal sculptures with an attitude. John’s artistic vision gave life to this hodgepodge of scrap metal. He has built a triceratops, a Texas longhorn, a deer head, a bear, a stately bison, and quite a few horses. He has a plow-horse (complete with plow and plowman), a prancing steed, and a rodeo horse. He got his raw materials from farming implements, musical instruments, and sports equipment. He said during an interview: “My favorite part about these pieces is the texture, I just start grabbin’ stuff from the pile and welding it, in and if you weld enough of the same thing on over and over it creates this really cool texture that I’ve never seen in these kinds of pieces before. And I think that’s what draws people in.””

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A Little Bit Lost – Images by Benjamin Heath

By on August 18, 2014, in Photography

Benjamin Heath is the kind of guy who enjoys getting a little lost. As an avid photographer, getting lost is a good thing, as it offers you opportunities to capture moments you otherwise would not have come across had you stayed on the right path. Benjamin’s landscapes are awesome but his portraits are even better. His list of clients include Levi’s, Lincoln Motor Company, and Uber. Benjamin has slowly gained a huge following online for his passion in capturing personal stories through his photography.

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Dog Breath Photography by Kaylee Greer

By on August 17, 2014, in Photography

Kaylee Greer is the founder and owner of Dog Breath Photography. True to its name, the studio specializes in creating memorable images of you and your beloved pooch. Unlike other photography studious, Kaylee will go to great lengths to capture the best possible image of your furry best friend, one that highlights their innate cuteness. Kaylee found her passionin pet photography while in college and absolutely knew there was no other way of life for her. These days, she’s living her dream as a full-time, Boston-based dog photographer. She said: “It’s that same smile – on the face of your best friend – that I am working to immortalize. I want to capture those goofy smiles, furry facial expressions, and happy tail-wags that make your world a better place. So, I am here to pause those brilliant, happy moments in time and give you the ability to hold on to them forever. I am passionate about capturing the honesty of your dog’s soul and the beauty of his simplicity. When my camera and your dog meet – wonderful things tend to happen.” Also, she gives free belly rubs.

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Behind Bars – Illustrations by Celia Krampien

By on August 16, 2014, in Illustrations

 

Celia Krampien is a freelanceillustrator currently based in Ontario, Canada. Her work is a comforting combination of precise linework, subtle textures, and a bright color palette. Celia loves to draw anything to do with plants and often work them into her digital illustrations. What I love about her work is the simplicity. But the longer you stare at her work makes you think harder about what’s going on in it. It is the subtle depth of her work that got Celia a rather impressive list of clients including: The LA Times, The Globe and Mail, and The Finacial Post.

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Outbreak – Delicate Paper Sculptures by Rogan Brown

By on August 15, 2014, in Sculpture

Rogan Brown describes his latest series Outbreak as an exploration of the microbiological sublime. The series took him four months to make as each interconnected paper sculpture was painstakingly cut by hand. Although based on the microbes, cells, pathogens, and neurons; Outbreak is a re-imagined version of these microscopic entities. Rogan said: “I am inspired in part by the tradition of scientific drawing and model making, and particularly the work of artist-scientists such as Ernst Haeckel. But although my approach involves careful observation and detailed “scientific” preparatory drawings, these are always superseded by the work of the imagination; everything has to be refracted through the prism of the imagination, estranged and in some way transformed.

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A Week’s Worth – Environmental Photography by Gregg Segal

By on August 14, 2014, in Photography

Wasteful is a god adjective as any to describe the habits of the average America. According to studies the average Joe generates around four pounds of garbage a day. Gregg Segal is a Californian photographer who wanted to put things in perspective with his series “7 Days of Garbage”. The series features shots of families, friends, and neighbors wallowing in a weeks worth of trash they’ve created. Most of his models were volunteers who believed in the idea behind the shoot, while few had to be compensated. Gregg wanted to enforce the idea that garbage is everywhere and that no environment is left untouched by it. He said: “7 Days of Garbage is a series of portraits of friends, neighbors, and other acquaintances with the garbage they accumulate in the course of a week. Subjects are photographed surrounded by their trash in a setting that is part nest, part archeological record. We’ve made our bed and in it we lie.

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Mimicked Murmurations – Conceptual Art by Alain Delorme

By on August 13, 2014, in Concept Art

 

Murmurations are synchronized movement of flocks of birds, usually starlings. The patterns they create are beautiful and fleeting. Alain Delorme is the artist behind these recreations of starling murmurations. His murmurations are made up of meticulously arranged plastic bags instead of birds but the essence of the patterns are the same. He said: “The mesmerizing act is typically seen at dusk throughout Europe, between November and February. Each evening, shortly before sunset, starlings can be seen performing breathtaking aerial manoeuvres, before choosing a place to roost for the night. These range in number from a few hundred to tens of thousands of birds. Murmurations exhibit strong spatial coherence and show extremely synchronized maneuvers, which seem to occur spontaneously, or in response to an approaching threat.”

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