What I Be – Daring Portraits by Steve Rosenfield

By on March 17, 2014, in Photography

Steve Rosenfield is the daring photographer behind the “What I Be Project”. He asked volunteers to write their insecurities on skin using a marker. Often, what they wrote are the unkind labels that society had given them such as ‘homo’, ‘trans’, and ‘fat’. My favorite one is the granny with ‘Hitler’ written in the raised middle finger of her right hand. In an interview Steve revealed that he was touched by the participant’s willingness to share their story and how their labels and insecurities affected their lives and relationships. He said: “The ‘What I Be Project’ is all about honesty. n today’s society, we are told to look or act a certain way. If we differ from these ‘standards,’ we are often judged, ridiculed, and sometimes even killed over them. I started this project in hopes to open up the lines of communication, and to help everyone accept diversity with an open mind & heart.”

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Cracked Portraits – Paintings by Taisuke Mohri

By on March 16, 2014, in Paintings

Taisuke Mohri was born in Sapporo, Japan on 1938. He obtained his Bachelor’s Degree in Industrial Arts from the prestigious Tokyo Art University in 2009. His work has been featured in several group exhibitions in Tokyo including “FRANTIC UNDERLINES” by Frantic Gallery in 2010, “Extra Real” Exhibition by ULTRA002 in Spiral Garden, and “Graduated Works Exhibition of Tokyo Art University” by the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Art. Recently, he has had a couple of solo exhibition of his work at the Frantic Gallery in Tokyo, “”The Resurrections” and “The Cracked Portraits”.

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Out of Context – Photorealistic Paintings by William Fisk

By on March 15, 2014, in Paintings

William Fisk is a Canadian painter who specializes in creating photo-realistic paintings. As is the aim of every painter who subscribes to realism, William’s paintings are so realistic it will make you want to reach into the painting to use the objects themselves.When asked about his Portrait series, he said: “The objects depicted in the Portrait Series were purchased second hand, without any tangible reference to the previous owner. They are specific utilitarian objects — 35mm cameras, light bulbs, shoes, pay phones, trophies, furniture, and clothing — that have experienced undeterminable yet indisputable human contact…My intent is to provide viewers with the means to make a distinction between the private and public meaning of the specific objects depicted….This intention is confirmed by the fact that each portrait represents a coherent conceptual format that invites viewers to examine the substance of its form and content.”

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Ribbonesia – Sculptures by Baku Maeda

By on March 14, 2014, in Sculpture

Baku Maeda is the imaginative artist behind Ribbonesia. It all started when he took note of the the gross under-appreciation of the beauty and simplicity of ribbons and decided to do something about it. Combining artistry and his love of animals, Maeda created an entire menagerie out of folded ribbons. Pretty soon, his work expanded into nature-themed masks, headdresses, and designs. Maeda is currently based in Sapporo, Japan.

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The Beauty Within – Portraits by Henry Leutwyler

By on March 13, 2014, in Photography

“This is the only thing I like to do and why I wake up in the morning.” said Henry Leutwyler, photographer of the stars. He was born in Switzerland in 1961. He moved to France to become an apprentice to Gilles Tapie, a distinguished photographer. After firmly establishing himself as a talented editorial photographer, he moved to the Big Apple in the mid-90s. These days, he captures portraits for big Hollywood stars like Julia Roberts, Martin Scorses, Lucy Liu, Robert Downey Jr., and Rihanna. He said: “There’s a whole new vocabulary surrounding photography that I find quite vulgar. For me, it’s not about ‘shooting’ and sensationalism. It’s a magic moment that happens in the first few minutes of a sitting. Revealing something from out of my subjects that isn’t obvious — finding the beauty within.”

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Antsy – Hand Painted Porcelain Design by Evelyn Bracklow

By on March 12, 2014, in Design

Evelyn Bracklow is the artist responsible for the army of ants crawling all over this delicate porcelain tea set. She hand-painted them herself. She calls it “Chitins Gloss”. Evelyn summed it up pretty well when she said: “Fear, disgust, fascination and admiration: this very interplay of feelings constitutes the charm of the work. Furthermore, to me, the ants symbolize all the stories that any formerly discarded piece of porcelain carries with it. Where one once dined and drank, today ants bustle in ever new formations, every single one applied with a great love for detail.”

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Cute Up Close – Arachnid Macrophotography by Jimmy Kong

By on March 11, 2014, in Photography

If eyes are windows to the soul, then spiders are basically leaking soul right out of their eyes. Spiders are universally feared, for their bite, hairiness, and overabundance of legs. But seen through a macro lens, these poisonous, hairy, eight-legged critters are actually quite cute. These close-ups of unexpectedly adorable arachnids are the work of Malaysian photographer Jimmy Kong. I love the way he captures the spider’s eyes; you can even see his reflection in them. I sure hope he didn’t engage any of them in a staring contest. Spiders don’t blink; they don’t have eyelids.

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Small Wonders – Fantastic Digital Images by Joel Robison

By on March 10, 2014, in Photography

Joel Robison is a budding artist who lives in a valley in British Columbia’s Rocky Mountains. According to him: “I love to run, bike, jump, eat and create and I hope that you enjoy my work as much as I enjoy creating it!”. Joel’s imagination is fired up by living as close to the forest as he possibly can. His work is an interesting combination of whimsy, fantasy, and imagination. What’s fun about his work is that the viewer knows that it’s just a product of digital image manipulation, but allows themselves to believe in it anyway.

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Painting With Fabric – Tulle Creations by Benjamin Shine

By on March 9, 2014, in Sculpture

Benjamin Shine is a gifted British artist and sculptor who expresses his creativity using one of the most unlikely mediums – tulle fabric. He crafts images out of tool fabric using nothing more than a hot iron and his imagination. Benjamin has done quite a full abstract designs as well as full celebrity portraits. In an interview, here is what he said of his work: “The idea of ‘painting with fabric’ led to the development of this technique where the portrait image is created through the intricate pleating and pressing of a single length of tulle fabric. The technique aims to utilize the translucent qualities of the tulle fabric to generate various gradients, tones and textures.”

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Ordinary, Everyday Awesomeness – Photographs by Brock Davis

By on March 8, 2014, in Photography

Brock Davis is an art director, illustrator, graphic designer, and photographer. He has numerous accolades and awards under his belt and his list of clients include big industry names such as Porsche, Harley-Davidson, Esquire, and the New York Times. In this series, he showcases the artistic potential of ordinary, everyday objects. No fancy cameras, lighting, or digital manipulation – just oodles of creativity. Brock also started his very own “Make Something Cool Every Day” project where he makes one piece of art a day, everyday, for a whole year. He is currently based in Minneapolis where his lives with his wife, his two wonderful kids, and his dog Zelda.

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