Glass with Class – Smoke Paintings by Jim Dingilian

By on August 5, 2014, in Design

smoke art bottles jim dangilian 10 Glass with Class – Smoke Paintings by Jim Dingilian

These smokey bottles are the creations of artist Jim Dingilian. Coating the insides of the bottles with soot is the easy part, brushing it away with tools set on dowels is the hand-cramping part, recognizing smoke/soot as a medium is simply a stroke of genius. His art has been described as “dripping with a sense of suburban decay” but I rather like it. The scene inside the bottles changes with every twist. Using ‘found’ objects like old bottles is a deliberate move by the artist. He said: “When found by the sides of roads or in the weeds near the edges of parking lots, empty liquor bottles are artifacts of consumption, delight, or dread. As art objects, they become hourglasses of sorts, their drained interiors now inhabited by dim memories.

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Rock Circles – Installations by Dietmar Voorwold

By on August 3, 2014, in Sculpture

land art dietmar voorworld 6 Rock Circles – Installations by Dietmar Voorwold

Dietmar Voorwold’s is an outstanding German artist behind these intricately placed rock circles. All of his work are done with materials he finds on site, mainly different colored rocks and leaves. None of his work are made to last for more than a few days and all that are eventually left of them are pictures and memories. Looking at his work is actually kinda soothing, which is probably what he had in mind when he created them. He said: “It is just for the moment. This is a very therapeutic aspect of my way of creating art.” Dietmar is currently based in Scotland.

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Dioramic Graffiti by Benjamin Affagard

By on August 1, 2014, in Sculpture

benjamin affagard 176 Dioramic Graffiti by Benjamin Affagard

Benjamin Affagard is not another graffiti artist. His work is strictly small scale and couldn’t even be classified as street art. A first glance at his work might leave the viewer unimpressed, but a closer look will reveal that the graffiti is actually part of a small, realistic, handmade diorama. The scenes, inspired by real life locations, are meticulously recreated with all sorts of things like wood,cardboard, acrylic paint, potato bags,and plastic straws. Benjamin sends the miniature walls/storefronts to various graffiti artists for them to paint giving the finished product an authentic feel.

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Fluff, Grit, and Bristles – Industrial Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki

By on July 26, 2014, in Sculpture

takahiro iwasaki 85 Fluff, Grit, and Bristles – Industrial Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki

Takahiro Iwasaki is the artist behind these industrial landscapes made with bits of fluff, grit and bristles. The sculpture up there is part of his “Out of Disorder” series – sculptures featuring miniature industrial landscapes made out of human hair, toothbrush bristles, used cloth fibers, lint, and actual dust. The sculptures resemble urban land leveled by an air raid, form the base of the Kawasaki series. Takahiro, based in Hiroshima, Japan currently has his work displayed at the Kawasaki City Museum as part of the Open Museum Project.

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Awesome Overflowing Embroidery by Ana Teresa Barboza

By on July 21, 2014, in Sculpture

embroidery art thread landscapes ana teresa barboza 1 Awesome Overflowing Embroidery by Ana Teresa Barboza

Ana Teresa Barboza is an artist who thinks out of the box and decided to elevate the art of embroidery. Her creations are not limited to the embroidery circle. They flow right out and practically begs the onlooker to touch them. Ana uses threads of various colors, sizes, lengths to achieve this effect. She said: “Both embroidery and crocheting are techniques that require time. I use these techniques in order to make a connection between manual work and the processes of nature; creating thread structures similar to the structures that make a plant for example.”

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Extraordinary Wall Art by Yusuke Asai

By on July 20, 2014, in Interior Design

yusuke asai waf 6 Extraordinary Wall Art by Yusuke Asai

Yusuke Asai is the artist behind this extraordinary mural painted right into the walls of a classroom in India. Yusuke is part of the team of artists sent by The Wall Art Project to Niranjana, a school located in Bahir (East India). The Wall Art Project is a Tokyo-based non-profit organization whose goal is to bring art into schools in far flung areas like Tibet and India. Yusuke is best known for making absurdly beautiful works of art with pretty much anything he can get his hands on. A trait which came in handy in East India. The extraordinary wall painting you see up there was made with seven different types of local soil, cow dung (don’t ask why), straw, and water. The wall art disintegrated after several months but I bet it’s beauty lasted in the minds of those children long after it completely washed away.

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Murrine Sculptures by Loren Stump

By on July 19, 2014, in Sculpture

crystal1 Murrine Sculptures by Loren Stump

Loren Stump is a California-based artist who decided to master the ancient art of creating murrine sculptures. Murrine is created by layering different colored glass around a core. By heating, stretching, and twisting the glass, a design is created on the inside. The design is revealed when the glass is cut crosswise. The process originated in the Middle East and was later adapted by Venetian glassmakers in the 16th century. Loren has been perfecting his technique for over 35 years and his most complicated piece to date is an interpretation of Da Vinci’s “Virgin on the Rocks”. The slices are worth more than $5,000 each.

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Treasures Within – Unique Rock Sculptures by Hirotoshi Ito

By on July 14, 2014, in Sculpture

creative stone sculptures hirotoshi ito 6 Treasures Within – Unique Rock Sculptures by Hirotoshi Ito

Hirotoshi Ito takes the cake for crafting these awesome, weir, and downright bizarre rock sculptures. He takes ordinary river rocks and turns them into zippered, sliced, and grinning versions of themselves. Hirohito juxtaposes the natural cracks and seams in a rock into whatever shape he happens to fancy, topping it all off with shiny (sometimes fluffy) modifications that bring them to life. It’s not uusual for his rock sculptures to grin right back at you, or reveal treasure hidden within. He said: “Although I work with various kinds of stones, most of my work consists of optimizing a stone’s original shape.”

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Framed – Sculptures by Benedict Radcliffe

By on July 10, 2014, in Sculpture

DSC01375mike 960 Framed – Sculptures by Benedict Radcliffe

Benedict Radcliffe is a designer and sculptor who has gained world-wide popularity with his frame cars. The cars are startlingly realistic for something completely made out of wire. They look like something an invisible man might ride to work. The hollow, see-through,make-believe automobiles are innocuously parked on curbs, daring passersby to “drive” them Flintstones style. Benedict is a graduate of the Mackintosh School of Architecture in Glasgow. He has been involved in various architectural commissions and signature sculptural pieces for international clients. When not traveling, he is currently based in London where he has his own studio.

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Layered – Trompe L’oeil Sculptures by Ron Isaacs

By on July 6, 2014, in Sculpture

art ron isaacs 04 Layered –  Trompe L’oeil Sculptures by Ron Isaacs

Those realistic sculptures of clothes and plants are actually nothing more than cleverly layered pieces of birch plywood meticulously crafted by sculptor Ron Isaacs in the trompe l’oeil fashion to resemble the real thing.Sure, he could’ve just used actual leaves and clothes, but that’s just too easy, where’s the challenge in that? In his artist’s statement, he said: “

I could use real objects to make assemblages, installations, or collages, but that’s too direct. My three primary recurring subjects are vintage clothing (for the way it continues the life of the past into the present, for its rich structures and colors and shapes, and for its anthropomorphic presence as a stand-in for the figure); plant materials in the form of sticks, leaves, and flowers (for too many reasons to list); and found objects. They combine in appropriate or surprising juxtapositions, sometimes purely as a visual “poem” of sorts and (if I’m lucky) sometimes as an image with real psychological resonance. Objects occasionally reappear in other contexts and take on new meanings, like a repertory company of actors playing different roles in different plays.”

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