Dog Breath Photography by Kaylee Greer

By on August 17, 2014, in Photography

dogs dog breath photography kaylee greer 20 Dog Breath Photography by Kaylee Greer

Kaylee Greer is the founder and owner of Dog Breath Photography. True to its name, the studio specializes in creating memorable images of you and your beloved pooch. Unlike other photography studious, Kaylee will go to great lengths to capture the best possible image of your furry best friend, one that highlights their innate cuteness. Kaylee found her passionin pet photography while in college and absolutely knew there was no other way of life for her. These days, she’s living her dream as a full-time, Boston-based dog photographer. She said: “It’s that same smile – on the face of your best friend – that I am working to immortalize. I want to capture those goofy smiles, furry facial expressions, and happy tail-wags that make your world a better place. So, I am here to pause those brilliant, happy moments in time and give you the ability to hold on to them forever. I am passionate about capturing the honesty of your dog’s soul and the beauty of his simplicity. When my camera and your dog meet – wonderful things tend to happen.” Also, she gives free belly rubs.

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A Week’s Worth – Environmental Photography by Gregg Segal

By on August 14, 2014, in Photography

7 days of garbage 116 A Week’s Worth – Environmental Photography by Gregg Segal

Wasteful is a god adjective as any to describe the habits of the average America. According to studies the average Joe generates around four pounds of garbage a day. Gregg Segal is a Californian photographer who wanted to put things in perspective with his series “7 Days of Garbage”. The series features shots of families, friends, and neighbors wallowing in a weeks worth of trash they’ve created. Most of his models were volunteers who believed in the idea behind the shoot, while few had to be compensated. Gregg wanted to enforce the idea that garbage is everywhere and that no environment is left untouched by it. He said: “7 Days of Garbage is a series of portraits of friends, neighbors, and other acquaintances with the garbage they accumulate in the course of a week. Subjects are photographed surrounded by their trash in a setting that is part nest, part archeological record. We’ve made our bed and in it we lie.

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Asylum – Photography by Jeremy Harris

By on August 12, 2014, in Photography

American Asylum Jeremy Harris 07 Asylum – Photography by Jeremy Harris

American Asylums is a series by photographer Jeremy Harris which delves into the heart of abandoned mental institutions across the East Coast and New England. The asylums are in a state of decay, having been closed, abandoned, and forgotten a long time ago. Some images are a little creepy and I can’t help but think of Arkham Asylum, Dr. Hannibal Lecter, and horror movies set in hospitals. Maybe these facilities were more cheerful when they were in their prime, but any institution with bars in the windows can’t possibly be a happy place to spend most of your adult life.

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Russian Salt Mines – Daring Photography by Mikhail Mishainik

By on August 8, 2014, in Photography

4 Russian Salt Mines – Daring Photography by Mikhail Mishainik

When you stare too long at the walls of Russian salt mines, after a while, they start to stare right back at you. Daredevil photographer Mikhail Mishainikfound this out the hard way when he went to an abandoned salt mine 650-feet below the city of Yekaterinburg in Russia. He has spent over twenty hours exploring the place and found colorfully hypnotic patterns of carnallite on the floors, walls, and ceilings of the mine. Carnallite is a rich source of magnesium and is mainly used to make crop fertilizers. He said: “It is hard to describe how it feels being so far down, you lose all track of time and the air is very dry, you always feel thirsty. There is the possibility of a gas leak from chemicals such as methane, hydrogen sulphide carbon dioxide as well the risk of a landslide. The danger element is part of the fun and it’s a special feeling being somewhere very few people have seen.”

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Photoshop Magic by Martin De Pasquale

By on August 2, 2014, in Photography

photoo manipulations by martin de pasquale 5 Photoshop Magic by Martin De Pasquale

Most artists use Photoshop to erase the flaws in their work, but not Martin De Pasquale. his Argentinian artistis currently an art director in an advertising agency but he is slowly gaining worldwide renown for his surreal digital art. In his world, you don’t take a bite out of an apple, it takes a bite out of you. You can unscrew your head or drag it through the streets, you can also sit sideways on a lamppost and ride an invisible bicycle. Heck you can even shave your face with a lawnmower if you like. Martin’s ideas are wacky and his execution is perfect. He is one up-and-coming artist we should all watch out for.

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Foggy Forest Photography by Guillermo Caballa

By on July 31, 2014, in Photography

1lyMcYx Foggy Forest Photography by Guillermo Caballa

Guillermo Caballa is an uber talented woodland photographer currently based in Vigo, Spain. Most of his portfolio are shots taken from the forest of Galicia. A rather significant number of them also feature his direwolf, er, dog Malu. Guillermo loves taking shots of foggy forests with his trusty Olympus E-M5. The fog should’ve made his shots spooky, but it doesn’t. Instead, it lends the image a tranquil atmosphere. At least until winter comes.

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Pursuit – Incredible Weather Photography by Stephen Locke

By on July 29, 2014, in Photography

8 17 09  0322 11x16.1 Pursuit – Incredible Weather Photography by Stephen Locke

One look at Stephen Locke’s images and you’ll wonder when Thor would show up with his hammer. That vicious-looking cloud up there spewing lightning volts is not the harbinger of doomsday, it is simply a supercell storm. According to Wikipedia, “supercells are the overall least common and have the potential to be the most severe”. Normal people take one look at that cloud and start running away in the opposite direction, Stephen Locke on the other hand, chases after it with his camera in tow. Which is a good thing for us because it means WE don’t have to run after supercell storms to appreciate their awesomeness.

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Shooting Heroes – Sport Photography by Philip Haynes

By on July 28, 2014, in Photography

photography philip haynes 02 Shooting Heroes – Sport Photography by Philip Haynes

Philip Haynes describes himself as a Norwich boy who happens to shoot heroes. He is currently based in the UK with an impressive list of clients including Men’s Health, O2, and Converse. Represented by The Peter Bailey Company, Philip looks to ‘capture the energy of saturation in color, just as much as the energy within the movement’. One of his more recent series, The Crossfitters, highlights the pain, intensity, and determination of the athletes.

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Reality vs Photoshop – Awesome Images by Martín De Pasquale

By on July 27, 2014, in Photography

Martin De Pasquale11 Reality vs Photoshop – Awesome Images by Martín De Pasquale

Martín De Pasquale is currently making waves all over the internet with his amazing photoshop wizardry. With awesome concepts and flawless composition, Martin is gathering quite a following. He is his favorite model and he’s not shy of taking bites out of himself, peeling off his face, or even dragging his head on the pavement. The surreal circumstances he puts himself in is rather quirky and amusing. The whole web is itching to see more from this Buenos Aires-based artist.

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Broken Mirror/Evening Sky – Images by Bing Wright

By on July 25, 2014, in Photography

photography bing wright 10 Broken Mirror/Evening Sky – Images by Bing Wright

Bing Wright is a New York-based photographer who is not at all concerned with the seven years’ bad luck associated with broken mirrors. In his series Broken Mirror/Evening Sky, he features broken mirrors reflecting sunsets and evening skies. The mirrors Wright uses are actually quite small at fourteen by eleven inches’ compared to the final prints which measure four feet by six feet. The images resemble stained glass windows and according to one website, “(the) series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure.”.

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