Too Beautiful to be True – Breathtaking Landscapes by Marcin Sobas

By on September 26, 2012, in Photography

4 Too Beautiful to be True – Breathtaking Landscapes by Marcin Sobas

Marcin Sobas is a Polish photographer who has a unique approach to landscape photography. Instead of wide angles, Marcin uses a telephoto zoom lens making his shots appear immense in scope. His inspirations are his family, travel, exploration of beautiful places, and life in general. According to him: “A picture needs to have a story in itself. Only then a photographer can pass to the audience something great. ”

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Water Wigs – Photos by Tim Tadder

By on September 25, 2012, in Photography

photos by tim tadder part3 4 Water Wigs – Photos by Tim Tadder

Tim Tadder does it again. With a thorough grasp of fluid mechanics and split-second timing, he has managed to make yet another impressive series featuring water. Water wigs was created with the use of water-filled balloons, colored lighting, and willing victi-er-subjects. Laser and sound triggers were used to capture the water balloon’s explosion on the bald subjects, giving them a brilliant new hairstyle.

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Oldschool Tintype Portraits by Michael Shindler

By on September 24, 2012, in Photography

book 12 Oldschool Tintype Portraits by Michael Shindler

Valencia street in San Francisco is home to Photobooth, the world’s last remaining tintype portrait studio. Michael Shindler, the owner and operator of Photobooth, spent six years studying the Wet-Plate Collodion process. This is commonly called tintype since the image can be produced on black metal or glass. Tintype was first introduced in the 1850s, over a hundred and sixty years ago. The process takes around ten minutes and is both delicate and messy. One slip-up and you’ll have to do the whole thing all over again. Over 3,500 people (and one dog) have had themselves immortalized under Michael’s capable hands since the shop opened a year ago.

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Fleeting Flowers – Splash Photography by Jack Long

By on September 21, 2012, in Photography

liquid flowers jack long 5 Fleeting Flowers – Splash Photography by Jack Long

These flowers have lifespans of mere milliseconds. Jack Long, a Milwaukee-based photographer coaxed them to life using water, a thickening agent, pigment, and dye. What’s even more remarkable is that this series, entitled “Vessels and Blooms” was not digitally manipulated in any way. All of Jack’s images occurred in a single exposure. Beautiful these fleeting flowers may be, I’d hate to be the one to clean up his studio.

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The Absence of Light – Shadow Photography by Alexey Bednij

By on September 18, 2012, in Photography

Alexey Bednij81 The Absence of Light – Shadow Photography by Alexey Bednij

“There is no such thing as darkness, only the absence of light.” – Albert Einstein. Alexey Bednij is a Russian photographer who gives us a closer look at this absence of light. His series on shadows may look like the product of infinite patience, but a look a little longer and you’ll realize that shadows are cast in only one direction. Digital manipulation notwithstanding, the contrast between the black and white tones in Alexey’s work reminds the viewer of M.C. Escher drawings.

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Maddie’s Balanced Diet – Photographs by Theron Humphrey

By on September 16, 2012, in Photography

Theron Humphrey part2 14 Maddie’s Balanced Diet – Photographs by Theron Humphrey

Theron Humphrey was born and raised in the Southern United States. He fell in love with photography while studying in the Appalachian Mountains. He woke up one morning with a the idea of re-connecting with common folks and their stories, thus was born his series “This Wild Idea”. While roaming around the country, he took his dog Maddie with him. “Maddie on Things” is an art project featuring Maddie, standing on top of random objects.

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Mesmerizing Landscapes and Portraits by Marco Walker

By on September 15, 2012, in Photography

Marco Walker9 Mesmerizing Landscapes and Portraits by Marco Walker

Marco Walker was born to a family of keen amateur photographers. His early exposure to galleries and museums must’ve been a factor in making him the photographer tat he is today. Although he has shot many stunning pictures of Yosemite Natural park using a digital camera and infrared light, he prefers to shoot with film and use natural light. According to him: “I have been lucky enough to visit many wonderful places, and it seems almost rude not to capture this in my work.”

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A Graceful Pause by Anton Surkov

By on September 12, 2012, in Photography

Anton Surkov3 A Graceful Pause by Anton Surkov

Movement, grace, sensuality – words that come to mind when looking at Anton Surkov’s yet untitled series featuring dancers perfectly captured while in motion. The liberal use of chalk dust accentuates the outline of the dancers. Well-toned bodies are shown to their best advantage with the contrasting use of light and dark. Judging from this series, this Ukrainian photographer will soon rise through the ranks of photography.

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Portraits of Oneself by Arno Rafaesl Minkkinen

By on September 11, 2012, in Photography

Arno Rafael Minkkinen1 600x838 Portraits of Oneself by Arno Rafaesl Minkkinen

Arno Rafaesl Minkkinen is a performance artist and a photographer. He started making self-portraits in the early seventies and hasn’t stopped making them since. Most of his shots are difficult and dangerous enough that a lot of photographers wouldn’t attempt them even when fully clothed. Arno, on the other hand, does it naked as the day he was born. He obviously enjoys the challenge. He has even incorporated himself into some of his landscapes with surprisingly pleasing results.

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Faux Renaissance Portraits by Josef Fischnaller

By on September 4, 2012, in Photography

Josef Fischnaller2 Faux Renaissance Portraits by Josef Fischnaller

Josef Fischnaller is a Berlin-based Austrian fashion and advertising photographer. He studied photography at the Academy of Graphic Design in Vienna and currently has his own studio in Berlin. A closer look at his renaissance-inspired portraits will give you some pleasant surprises. Mona Lisa didn’t sit in a swivel chair and had a lip ring. Subtly scattered throughout his work are ski-poles, french fries, a cigarette, a pair of forks, an umbrella, and even a bottle of wine. This guy loves hiding Easter eggs all over.

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