Outbreak – Delicate Paper Sculptures by Rogan Brown

By on August 15, 2014, in Sculpture

paper 6 Outbreak – Delicate Paper Sculptures by Rogan Brown

Rogan Brown describes his latest series Outbreak as an exploration of the microbiological sublime. The series took him four months to make as each interconnected paper sculpture was painstakingly cut by hand. Although based on the microbes, cells, pathogens, and neurons; Outbreak is a re-imagined version of these microscopic entities. Rogan said: “I am inspired in part by the tradition of scientific drawing and model making, and particularly the work of artist-scientists such as Ernst Haeckel. But although my approach involves careful observation and detailed “scientific” preparatory drawings, these are always superseded by the work of the imagination; everything has to be refracted through the prism of the imagination, estranged and in some way transformed.

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A Week’s Worth – Environmental Photography by Gregg Segal

By on August 14, 2014, in Photography

7 days of garbage 116 A Week’s Worth – Environmental Photography by Gregg Segal

Wasteful is a god adjective as any to describe the habits of the average America. According to studies the average Joe generates around four pounds of garbage a day. Gregg Segal is a Californian photographer who wanted to put things in perspective with his series “7 Days of Garbage”. The series features shots of families, friends, and neighbors wallowing in a weeks worth of trash they’ve created. Most of his models were volunteers who believed in the idea behind the shoot, while few had to be compensated. Gregg wanted to enforce the idea that garbage is everywhere and that no environment is left untouched by it. He said: “7 Days of Garbage is a series of portraits of friends, neighbors, and other acquaintances with the garbage they accumulate in the course of a week. Subjects are photographed surrounded by their trash in a setting that is part nest, part archeological record. We’ve made our bed and in it we lie.

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Mimicked Murmurations – Conceptual Art by Alain Delorme

By on August 13, 2014, in Concept Art

 

AlainDelorme Murmuration 07 Mimicked Murmurations – Conceptual Art by Alain Delorme

Murmurations are synchronized movement of flocks of birds, usually starlings. The patterns they create are beautiful and fleeting. Alain Delorme is the artist behind these recreations of starling murmurations. His murmurations are made up of meticulously arranged plastic bags instead of birds but the essence of the patterns are the same. He said: “The mesmerizing act is typically seen at dusk throughout Europe, between November and February. Each evening, shortly before sunset, starlings can be seen performing breathtaking aerial manoeuvres, before choosing a place to roost for the night. These range in number from a few hundred to tens of thousands of birds. Murmurations exhibit strong spatial coherence and show extremely synchronized maneuvers, which seem to occur spontaneously, or in response to an approaching threat.”

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Asylum – Photography by Jeremy Harris

By on August 12, 2014, in Photography

American Asylum Jeremy Harris 07 Asylum – Photography by Jeremy Harris

American Asylums is a series by photographer Jeremy Harris which delves into the heart of abandoned mental institutions across the East Coast and New England. The asylums are in a state of decay, having been closed, abandoned, and forgotten a long time ago. Some images are a little creepy and I can’t help but think of Arkham Asylum, Dr. Hannibal Lecter, and horror movies set in hospitals. Maybe these facilities were more cheerful when they were in their prime, but any institution with bars in the windows can’t possibly be a happy place to spend most of your adult life.

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Fresh from the Ground – BlackChocolateCo

By on August 11, 2014, in Design

il 570xN.398549661 p410 Fresh from the Ground – BlackChocolateCo

I’m pretty sure Dr. Hanibel Lecter will be pretty delighted by these sinful desserts by BlackChocolateCo. Handmade from the finest Belgian chocolate, these life-sized, anatomically correct skulls are a fitting choice for the doctor’s table. They even come in different flavors: dark chocolate, caramel chocolate, milk chocolate, and chilli chocolate. BlackChocolateCo is a UK-based chocolatier who has successfully combined their passion for art with a predilection for chocolates. These edible works of art has a rather impressive shelf life as long as it’s kept in a cool, dry area. They can be used as a centerpiece and will definite be a talking point in any dinner/event. All skulls are made to order and takes up to ten days to create.

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If Slogans Were Honest – Re-Imagined Slogans by Clif Dickens

By on August 10, 2014, in Concept Art

honest slogans brands clif dickens 5 If Slogans Were Honest – Re Imagined Slogans by Clif Dickens

Clif Dickens’ re-imagined brand slogans is a fun tongue-in-cheek jibe at some of the biggest brands on the market today. The grain (more of a boulder, really) of truth in his words will definitely make anyone smile. As they say in the business: There’s no such thing as bad publicity. People get a good laugh, and they’re brand gets advertised for free, albeit in a different light. I’m definitely looking forward to seeing more of Clif’s work in the future.

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Anti Gravity – Automobile Sculptures by Gerry Judah

By on August 9, 2014, in Sculpture

gerry judah 2012 12 Anti Gravity – Automobile Sculptures by Gerry Judah

The Goodwood Festival of Speed is an annual festival held in Sussex to celebrate iconic car models. Sculptor Gerry Judah is the perennial picked to erect a sculpture in honor of the event. He has created sculptures for Porsche, Jaguar, Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz, Rolls-Royce, Alfa Romeo, Renault, and Ford. His huge structures are always the central attraction of the annual event. One of his sculptures is a 60-ton behemoth featuring a winding, knot shaped road where six classic Lotus cars are cheekily defying the laws of physics.

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Russian Salt Mines – Daring Photography by Mikhail Mishainik

By on August 8, 2014, in Photography

4 Russian Salt Mines – Daring Photography by Mikhail Mishainik

When you stare too long at the walls of Russian salt mines, after a while, they start to stare right back at you. Daredevil photographer Mikhail Mishainikfound this out the hard way when he went to an abandoned salt mine 650-feet below the city of Yekaterinburg in Russia. He has spent over twenty hours exploring the place and found colorfully hypnotic patterns of carnallite on the floors, walls, and ceilings of the mine. Carnallite is a rich source of magnesium and is mainly used to make crop fertilizers. He said: “It is hard to describe how it feels being so far down, you lose all track of time and the air is very dry, you always feel thirsty. There is the possibility of a gas leak from chemicals such as methane, hydrogen sulphide carbon dioxide as well the risk of a landslide. The danger element is part of the fun and it’s a special feeling being somewhere very few people have seen.”

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Symmetrical Beehives – Sculptural Concepts by Ren Ri

By on August 7, 2014, in Sculpture

Ren Ri Beeswax Sculptures 01 Symmetrical Beehives – Sculptural Concepts by Ren Ri

Ren Ri is a Beijing-based beekeeper and artist. An odd combination to be sure, but Ren’s crossover from beekeeper to artist works. His creations are bee-based as well as bee-built. Ren is the one responsible for the concept, while the bees are responsible for the structure. His first bee-inspired series was entitled  Yuansu I: The Origin of Geometry which was a collection of maps rendered in beeswax. With its success, Ren decided to create a sequel. Yuansu II is a collection of five three-dimensional glass beehives where the bees have created an otherworldly structure inside.

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Definitions of Beauty by Esther Honig

By on August 6, 2014, in Concept Art

original photo Definitions of Beauty by Esther Honig

Esther Honig is an American photographer and journalist who wondered about the different standards of beauty around the world. To get an idea, she sent her photo to a bunch of freelance Photoshoppers from around the world with one instruction: Make me beautiful. The results vary from barely edited to wildly Photoshopped. She said: “(I hoped) that each designer will pull from their personal and cultural constructs of beauty to enhance my unaltered image.” And they did just that. Esther calls the entire project “Before and After”. Esther also added: “Each one is a reflection of both the personal and cultural concepts of beauty that pertain to their creator. Photoshop allows us to achieve our unobtainable standards of beauty, but when we compare those standards on a global scale, achieving the ideal remains all the more elusive.

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